Open positions – Postdoctoral positions in South Korea – Chemistry – UNIST

    Open positions - Postdoctoral positions in South Korea - Chemistry - UNIST

    Postdoctoral positions in South Korea (Open Positions) in Synthetic Organic Chemistry at Department of Chemistry in Synthetic & Medicinal Chemistry Lab, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology UNIST

    Postdoctoral positions in Synthetic Organic Chemistry at Department of Chemistry in Synthetic & Medicinal Chemistry Lab, UNIST



    Position

    Postdoctoral position

    No. of Position(s)

    Not specified

    Research area

    Synthetic Organic Chemistry

    Salary

    According to UNIST standards

    Workplace

    Synthetic & Medicinal Chemistry Lab
    Department of Chemistry
    Ulsan, Korea

    Contract period

    According to UNIST standards

    Inquiries

    Email: cmpark@unist.ac.kr

    Qualifications

    PhD in related fields

    Responsibilities/Job Description

    Related to research areas

    How to Apply?

    Email submission: cmpark@unist.ac.kr

    Documents required

    Curriculum vitae

    Research

    Organic molecules are found as key players in many fields from materials to medicine. Our research focuses on the development of new synthetic methods that facilitate the design and synthesis of bioactive compounds and chemical tools for pharmacological studies.

    The access to compounds with unique and diverse structures enables us to explore their potential as novel therapeutic leads, chemical switches and probes. In this regard, organic synthesis forms the foundation of our approach. Heterocyclic compounds represent an important class of compounds that are found in numerous bioactive natural products, drugs, and molecular probes. We have been engaged in the field of heterocycle synthesis by developing new synthetic methods based on metal catalysis. Also, we are actively engaged in developing strategies and methods to generate novel structures and to evaluate their pharmacological intervention including cancer.

    Another approach we are undertaking involves rational drug design where the discovery process begins with a hypothesis that the modulation of a target may have therapeutic value. To this end, extensive use of modern discovery tools such as parallel synthesis, computer-aided drug design, x-ray crystallography, and NMR allows us to rapidly identify potential lead compounds and further optimization.


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